psychology Archives - Harris Social Media

Marketers need to understand the bad side of using Facebook

on Aug 15 in facebook, marketing, psychology, social media posted , , by

facebook meme ecard

According to a BBC article published today, a University of Michigan study finds that Facebook use makes people feel worse about themselves. Interesting. But what does that mean?

The research seems to raise more questions than answers. If it’s true, why do people spend so much time on Facebook? But the study does not mean a death knell for Facebook. Other research shows that Facebook satisfies an innate psychological need for social connection.

That said, the findings have important implications for brands trying to connect with users on the social network. Marketers need to understand first and foremost that one-on-one social connections are the only way, in the long run, to build relationships with users. That is a hard grind, requiring time, effort, a minimum level of competency and authenticity. Sorry, no shortcuts.

Another important implication is that brands can work to ensure that users feel better rather than worse about themselves. The report cites the Fear Of Missing Out theory as one reason people feel bad after using Facebook. This concept suggests bad feelings arise as “a side effect of seeing friends and family sitting on beaches or having fun at parties while you are on a computer.”

Marketers could counter this perception of social isolation in several ways. For example, brands can reward engagement with increased interaction or incentives such as sweepstakes. These might help the user feel as though they belong to an in-group who are granted special privileges. Another possibility is to organize online (or even in-person) meet ups or clubs where users can share stories, products, special deals and so forth.

These approaches may not be easy to implement in practice. But brands must understand that Facebook usage does have negative consequences and they must be prepared to deal with that. Marketers must also understand that there are no easy fixes for creating an effective presence in social media. It’s a hard slog, and providing value and keeping commitments are not cheap, so your brand shouldn’t be either.

Could social media monitoring have prevented Arizona shooting tragedy?

on Jan 12 in monitoring, politics, psychology, social media, statistics, tools posted by

We’re all saddened by the tragic events in Arizona last weekened. Of course, media pundits have been busy assigning blame. And politicos have been equally busy fending off any patina of guilt. 

And of course, social commentators, psychologists and criminologists are pondering how to detect and prevent such heinous crimes. Gun control, screening mental patients, etc. are among the proposed suggestions.

But one stone unturned at this the point is the possibility of using social media monitoring to detect potential threats. Once detected, the threat can be further analyzed using the powerful statistical capabilities of these monitoring tools.

While it’s unlikely such events can ever be prevented with 100% certainty, here’s how social media monitoring (Radian, Alterian, etc.) could help identify and minimize threats.

1. These individuals want to be seen and heard. Jared Loughner, the alleged perpetrator of the Arizona shooting had created disturbing YouTube videos. He also had a MySpace page. Social media provides an outlet for the lonely, disenfranchised, attention-craving individual who might tend toward antisocial or criminal acts. Social media monitoring could profile such individuals and at least place them on a watch list.

2. Use of social media location-based apps could help track movements of such individuals. For example, if someone on the watch list posted a Facebook update that they were going to kill such-and-such and then Foursquare showed they have checked-in at a gun store, that would certainly be a red flag.

3. The monitoring could be provided by the social media monitoring companies as a service to society, rather than just getting us to buy more widgets or to cover corporate asses. Or government could invest in such a service.

It’s about time to use the technology we have and the typical behaviors of such individuals to minimize the likelihood of a similar tragedy.

Who is Big Brother?

on Nov 11 in panconsciousness, politics, psychology, quote of the day, social media, technology posted by

Quote of the Day, Nov 11, 2008

It’s ironic that the power to tap into the collective conscious through social media also gives us the power to control and judge the individuals who make up that consciousness. For those unfamiliar with the concept of Big Brother, it derives from the book 1984 by George Orwell. The story depicts a dystopian society that controls its citizens by feeding them “truth” (comprising lies) and 24/7 surveillance under the constant watch of the benign authorities (actually quite evil dictatorship).

“Yes, we have met Big Brother, the one who is always watching. And Big Brother is us.”

— Andrew Rasiej, founder of the Personal Democracy Forum

How Obama Tapped Into Social Networks’ Power

By David Carr, New York Times

The conceptual relationship of minds

on Oct 30 in psychology, quote of the day, Twitter posted by

Quote of the Day, Oct 30, 2008

Prompted by a Tweet from @gsmith I was inspired to revisit the concept of synchronicity. The word, first coined by psychologist CG Jung, defines perfectly much of my interaction on Twitter. It reaffirms the basic concepts of Twitter as an information management system.

“The idea of synchronicity is that the conceptual relationship of minds, defined as the relationship between ideas, is intricately structured in its own logical way and gives rise to relationships which are not causal in nature. Instead, causal relationships are understood as simultaneous—that is, the cause and effect occur at the same time.”

— Lumos3, Wikipedia editor

Wikipedia: Synchronicity